Hear and See the Full Presentation of “Project Charters Bridge Cultures”

Alex S. Brown, PMP IPMA-C

Learn how project charters successfully bridged cultural gaps when making decisions among a community of Japanese and U.S. executives. Establishing a clear chartering process was the key to project management’s success at the company. The presentation will include templates and overviews of the processes established.

This speech was delivered and recorded live for the PMI New Jersey chapter on International Project Management Day, November 2, 2006. You can hear the speech and see the slides right now. The entire speech 51-minute speech will play, with slides synchronized to the audio.

Technical Information

The speech is delivered in MP3 format. The entire presentation is about 18 MB and should play smoothly for most Internet connections, even many dial-up connections (anything over 48 kbps). To synchronize the slides, JavaScript must be enabled. It has been tested with both Firefox and Internet Explorer browsers, using QuickTime and Windows Media Player plug-ins. The VLC player has some known issues and will not synchronize the sound and slides.

Bio from the Event

Alex S. Brown, PMP, is the Manager of the Strategic Planning Office at Mitsui Sumitomo Insurance Group, USA. He also helps other firms solve their real-life project problems as President of his own company, Real-Life Projects, Inc. He has spoken at the last three PMI North America Congresses and the 2002 PMI Symposium, in addition to several regional and specific-interest project management events. This year will be his third presentation at a PMI NJ event. His articles have appeared in several newsletters, and he provides advice to peers internationally through his web site, http://www.alexsbrown.com. He has been a project manager for software development and financial services projects since 1993.

This speech was delivered and recorded live for the PMI North America Congress on September 12, 2005. You can hear the speech and see the slides right now. The entire 54-minute speech will play, with slides synchronized to the audio.